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Packing With Duluth Pack: For the Jet-Setter | Duluth Pack

Packing With Duluth Pack: For the Jet-Setter

Packing with Duluth Pack Series: For The Jet-Setter

Now that the summer months are rolling around and our world is beginning to open a little bit more, your friends at Duluth Pack have created a packing guide for all types of vacations that you plan to go on in the future. Use this guide to help you pack for your endeavors this summer, or to dream of that perfect vacation that you plan to take in the future. Today’s post is for the jet-setter.

The jet-setter is for those who feel at home while flying 30,000 feet in the air. For some, flying provides tranquility and peace that being on land doesn't. Even if you can’t travel by plane this summer, keep this guide in mind for the next time that you can act on your travel bug and go sightseeing once again.

How To Find The Right Canoe Pack | Duluth Pack

How To Find The Right Canoe Pack

The BWCAW is the most heavily used wilderness area in the United States of America. Thousands of canoers travel to these areas each year for traditional camping and canoeing experiences. While it is an adventure, prepping for the trip is not always the easiest task. So how do you know what canoe pack and gear to bring and what is going to be the best way to travel light without sacrificing comfort and resources?

Picking the best canoe pack sounds easy, but the planning for the trip can be the most crucial part. Forgetting or having to leave out even one item can impact your entire experience. Make sure you have the right amount of space for what you're bringing. Lucky for you, Duluth Pack has made it our priority to make sure we can prepare you for almost any scenario. 

Outdoor Guide: Snowshoeing 101 | Duluth Pack

Outdoor Guide: Snowshoeing 101

Snowshoeing 101

It might be to your surprise, but the development of snowshoeing dates back thousands of years ago. It’s believed that over 6,000 years ago in Central Asia, snowshoes were developed. Originally designed using pieces of leather-strapped to wooden blocks, snowshoes made it possible to track animals through the deep snow. Throughout time, the snowshoe design has evolved, but the purpose remains the same. 

 

When the 1900s rolled around, and more people were eager to explore, the evolution of recreational snowshoeing took off. Rather than using snowshoes solely as a means of travel, people began using the modernized snowshoes for exercise and leisure. Today, you can find most snowshoes made with aluminum frames and plastic mesh, rather than the original wooden blocks.

Throughout the years, the features of the snowshoe have advanced. On the modern-day snowshoe, you can find cleats beneath the shoe to grip icy trails and surfaces. With the advancements of newer materials, many creators strayed away from traditional designs.

Overtime, snowshoeing has become a widely popular activity, and ski resorts began to open snowshoe trails. In many stores today, you can find three main types of snowshoes that range from beginner to advanced.

Type 1: If it's your first-time snowshoeing, start with a pair of flat-terrain snowshoes. Flexible and with fewer traction features make this ideal for those who enjoy a more relaxed day on the trails.

Type 2: For a more challenging route, rolling terrain snowshoes are perfect for uphill and downhill courses. Designed to handle flat to relatively sloped terrains, they feature a more advanced traction system to help you move along the trail.

Type 3: If the mountains are calling your name and you’re a confident snowshoer, the mountain terrain snowshoe is your go-to. Designed for deep snow and steep icy conditions, the backcountry trails will be calling your name.

  

The snowshoes themselves may be the most necessary part of the venture, but don’t begin your adventure just yet. Let’s not forget about the extra gear that’ll make the journey a lot warmer and safe for you.

Don’t forget to pack proper clothing before the adventure begins! Having a warm, breathable, and moisture repellent jacket or vest is a must for snowshoeing. For additional support when you’re exploring the trails, bring along poles to help with your balance. It’s best to find poles that have a snow basket to help stay atop the snow.

To fully enjoy this winter activity, have a pair of waterproof and durable hiking boots set out for your adventure. Hydration is key! Before the adventure begins, let’s not overlook packing an insulated water bottle. Pack up your gear in a durable Duluth Pack backpack from our lifestyle or outdoor collection. Built for adventure and in various sizes, you’re sure to find the one that fits all your outdoor activity necessities.

You're finally all geared up and ready to explore! The only thing left to do is to find the perfect location. Across the country, you’ll discover that most cross-country ski trails allow snowshoers. When you’re choosing this area, be mindful and walk on the side of the groomed trail to avoid damaging the trails.

From National and State Parks to local ski resorts, each offer designated snowshoe trails. If you’re looking for a more secluded area that has deep and undisturbed power, a National Forest may be your best bet. If there's thick ice coating your beloved summertime river, snowshoeing on it can make it become your favorite year-round river, too.

It's best to call each location to ask about their rules for snowshoeing.

There are countless reasons to want to snowshoe the great outdoors. With a new hobby, come new friends. It’s a great way to get everyone together to be active and avoid being cooped up in the house all winter long. You’ll find hiking trails you couldn’t explore during the summer months, think of all the new scenery you’ll witness! If you thought summer was your favorite time of year, you might find yourself rethinking that once you latch-up those snowshoes for a day out on the trails. Snowshoeing is also a popular activity for those looking to go winter camping in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area.

With any outdoor activity, there are a few safety recommendations to keep in mind. Keeping yourself hydrated while you venture from trail to trail is crucial. It may sound overboard, but pack more water than you think you'll need. It’s best to bring an insulated water bottle that won’t freeze.

Give yourself the energy you need to make your way through the backcountry trails. Pack some light snacks and food before you embark on your adventure. Energy bars and a sandwich or two are great options. With this being a winter activity, food may freeze, try to pick options that won’t become rock-hard if they get frozen.

Even when your adventure starts during the daytime, your safety is necessary to think about around the clock. Winter, especially in Minnesota, can be unpredictable. Always pack a flashlight, just in case you end up in a blustery wind or the sunset happens sooner than you thought. If you're one to wander where the Wi-Fi is weak, let friends and family know the locations where you’ll be snowshoeing.

The winters are long in Minnesota, let’s start making the most of it, friends! Snowshoeing is a fun way to stay active during the snow-covered months. Use #PersonBehindThePack on social media, and let us know how you use yours throughout the winter. We might feature your story on our blog, The Pack Report.

 

Snowshoe on, friends!

Outdoor Guide: The Differences Between Wax Canvas and Traditional Canvas | Duluth Pack

Outdoor Guide: The Differences Between Wax Canvas and Traditional Canvas

If you are looking to buy your first Duluth Pack or looking to expand your collection you may be wondering what waxed canvas is and what the history behind it is? What is the difference between the waxed canvas and traditional non-wax canvas? 

Waxed canvas was originally used during the 1800s by Scottish fishermen who noticed ship sails caught more wind when they were wet. However wet sails were too heavy to be effective, so the sailors decided to use linseed oil to saturate the sails. By doing this, the sails were able to repel water and they caught the wind better, making for more efficient sailing. Linseed oil mimics the properties of water but without adding the additional weight. Once the sails reached the end of their life, they would be recycled into weather-resistant clothing to wear at sea. Over time this practice became so widespread that factories started producing waxed canvas for mass production.

Waxed canvas is just that, it is our traditional cotton duck 15 oz canvas which has been applied with a thin layer of wax on top of the canvas.  It is still made with our durable and rugged canvas, but we just go one step farther to create a bag with a quicker patina aesthetic. 

Our traditional canvas is a tight weave high strength fabric that holds up to the test of time. Canvas itself is not watertight so it has the potential to allow water on the inside of the bag which is why we recommend a poly pack liner if you are going on a canoe trip. Canvas is a wonderful material as it expands when wet, this is why it is an ideal choice and heavy-duty material for outdoor adventures and it is also time-tested. Canvas is a fairly breathable, yet wind-resistant fabric and fairly easy to clean. The bottom-line canvas is durable and will last for many generations to come.

Waxed canvas has all the benefits of our traditional canvas plus a few extra perks. The wax finish allows the water droplets to bead up on the surface and flow off creating the effect of a water-resistant finish. It also has higher wind-resistance compared to traditional non-canvas. The wax creates a thin membrane on the canvas which will also repel dirt. However, it will show some scuffs and marks more than the traditional canvas option, but this will add to the overall character of the bag. Waxed canvas can be more comfortable to wear, and some people say it has an overall softer feel to it. To care for your pack all you need to do is reapply oil wax finish depending on the amount of use. You should not put it in the washing machine as that will take most of the wax finish off. If you scrub it with soap and water, you may take off the finish too. Please read Duluth Pack’s care instructions on the website.

We must note, Duluth Pack packs, totes, duffels, and handcrafted products are not water-resistant and or water-proof. The seams are not sealed, and many needle holes penetrate the fabric. 

Hopefully, this answered your questions and made choosing your next Duluth Pack easier. 

Happy shopping, friends!